His photographs are simple but effective. Random, but intriguing. Hungarian photographer Andre Kertesz is said to be the father of photojournalism. As an autodidact he gained his first full experience while serving the Hungarian army in World War I, shooting frames of life in the trenches. After the war he - as fellow photographer and Hungarian Robert Capa - moved to Paris, where he was to be the first solo photographer to have his own show there in 1927. Kertesz supposedly didn’t earn the recognition he deserved during his lifetime, though he rarely received bad critics. Many see him as an inspiration, or as one of my favorite photographers - Henri Cartier-Bresson - put it: ‘We all owe him a great deal’. His photographs are simple but effective. Random, but intriguing. Hungarian photographer Andre Kertesz is said to be the father of photojournalism. As an autodidact he gained his first full experience while serving the Hungarian army in World War I, shooting frames of life in the trenches. After the war he - as fellow photographer and Hungarian Robert Capa - moved to Paris, where he was to be the first solo photographer to have his own show there in 1927. Kertesz supposedly didn’t earn the recognition he deserved during his lifetime, though he rarely received bad critics. Many see him as an inspiration, or as one of my favorite photographers - Henri Cartier-Bresson - put it: ‘We all owe him a great deal’. His photographs are simple but effective. Random, but intriguing. Hungarian photographer Andre Kertesz is said to be the father of photojournalism. As an autodidact he gained his first full experience while serving the Hungarian army in World War I, shooting frames of life in the trenches. After the war he - as fellow photographer and Hungarian Robert Capa - moved to Paris, where he was to be the first solo photographer to have his own show there in 1927. Kertesz supposedly didn’t earn the recognition he deserved during his lifetime, though he rarely received bad critics. Many see him as an inspiration, or as one of my favorite photographers - Henri Cartier-Bresson - put it: ‘We all owe him a great deal’. His photographs are simple but effective. Random, but intriguing. Hungarian photographer Andre Kertesz is said to be the father of photojournalism. As an autodidact he gained his first full experience while serving the Hungarian army in World War I, shooting frames of life in the trenches. After the war he - as fellow photographer and Hungarian Robert Capa - moved to Paris, where he was to be the first solo photographer to have his own show there in 1927. Kertesz supposedly didn’t earn the recognition he deserved during his lifetime, though he rarely received bad critics. Many see him as an inspiration, or as one of my favorite photographers - Henri Cartier-Bresson - put it: ‘We all owe him a great deal’. His photographs are simple but effective. Random, but intriguing. Hungarian photographer Andre Kertesz is said to be the father of photojournalism. As an autodidact he gained his first full experience while serving the Hungarian army in World War I, shooting frames of life in the trenches. After the war he - as fellow photographer and Hungarian Robert Capa - moved to Paris, where he was to be the first solo photographer to have his own show there in 1927. Kertesz supposedly didn’t earn the recognition he deserved during his lifetime, though he rarely received bad critics. Many see him as an inspiration, or as one of my favorite photographers - Henri Cartier-Bresson - put it: ‘We all owe him a great deal’. His photographs are simple but effective. Random, but intriguing. Hungarian photographer Andre Kertesz is said to be the father of photojournalism. As an autodidact he gained his first full experience while serving the Hungarian army in World War I, shooting frames of life in the trenches. After the war he - as fellow photographer and Hungarian Robert Capa - moved to Paris, where he was to be the first solo photographer to have his own show there in 1927. Kertesz supposedly didn’t earn the recognition he deserved during his lifetime, though he rarely received bad critics. Many see him as an inspiration, or as one of my favorite photographers - Henri Cartier-Bresson - put it: ‘We all owe him a great deal’.

His photographs are simple but effective. Random, but intriguing. Hungarian photographer Andre Kertesz is said to be the father of photojournalism. As an autodidact he gained his first full experience while serving the Hungarian army in World War I, shooting frames of life in the trenches. After the war he - as fellow photographer and Hungarian Robert Capa - moved to Paris, where he was to be the first solo photographer to have his own show there in 1927. Kertesz supposedly didn’t earn the recognition he deserved during his lifetime, though he rarely received bad critics. Many see him as an inspiration, or as one of my favorite photographers - Henri Cartier-Bresson - put it: ‘We all owe him a great deal’.